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Published on 10/1/2017 1:48:11 PM
DDA in no hurry to make Dwarka flyover safe
It is among the most dangerous roads for drivers in Delhi, with over 145 accidents reported in 2012-16. But Delhi Development Authority seems in no hurry to make the Dwarka flyover safer. For eight months now, it has been sitting on the prescription given by the Central Road Research Institute to minimise accidents on the 2-km stretch.

The flyover, constructed above a densely populated area, is a vital connection between Dwarka and south Delhi, but has become a serious concern for traffic police. To make the flyover safer, DDA had asked CSIR-CRRI in 2015 to conduct a safety audit. The audit report was submitted in January this year, but nothing has been done to carry through its advice.

CSIR-CRRI noted serious problems on the elevated road, but its officials said that DDA was yet to hold a meeting to discuss the audit findings. "As a policy, we present the audit findings and have a closure meeting to clarify doubts that the agency that has given us the task might have," said Dr S Velmurugan, senior principal scientist, traffic engineering and safety division, CSIR-CRRI. "There has been no meeting with DDA officials till date."

Among the foremost problem that the road experts noted on the flyover was the lack of shielding from the headlights of oncoming traffic. Because of the narrow road width, the median verge is not spacious enough for the greenery curtain. CSIR-CRRI, therefore, recommended the installation of anti-glare screens between the two carriageways. DDA did put up such screens on one of the five curves on the length of the flyover, but these have gone missing now.

Road delineators are missing at several places, particularly near curves, as are crash cushions near the mouth of the flyover and at the ramp leading to Palam Village. "We found the bollards damaged and the chevron markings faded. These are important from the point of road safety," added Velmurugan. "Crash cushions might be a bit expensive, but these are necessary on this stretch."

The report suggested that DDA and traffic police should replace all non-standard traffic signs with those complying with India Road Congress specifications. It asked for proper signboards to indicate the curves and the on/off ramps.

Delhi traffic officials admitted the need for such measures, including reflectors at curves and speed calming devices. Without outlining a time frame for implementing CSIR-CRRI's recommendations, a senior DDA official said, "These will be executed soon."



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